7 Tips For HDR Photography

High dynamic range photography is photography that offers a Higher Dynamic Range or higher tone range than your camera and sensor that can capture it yourself. That makes you able to take pictures of landscapes that were once very difficult to get because of the brightness from the spotlight to the shadow that is considered extreme. You can see sights like that, but your camera can't, so HDR photography has the potential to give your photos closer to what you see.

7 Tips For HDR Photography


HDR photography with multiple exposures from one scene to cover the brightness range in that landscape. Each exposure varies with one to two steps of changing exposure (one full f-stop is one step). This photo is best taken from the position of the camera that is locked on a tripod. Then it is brought to the computer so that it can combine tonality and the best color of many shots into one.

Here's 7 tips how to quickly and easily capture HDR:
  • Put your camera on a tripod and compose your image
  • Set your camera to the primed aperture mode. It is important to keep your depth of field consistent from each image. Pricing aperture mode allows you to adjust the f-stop and then tells the camera to vary the shutter speed for changes in exposure
  • Set your camera to auto exposure bracketing (AEB). Set your bracketing to get exposure changes at least one full step EV (exposure value). I found that often 1.5 steps work very well for me. Some cameras offer three exposures to the exposure value that you have selected. One exposure is based on what the camera meter thinks is good, one 1.5 step overexposed exposure, and one underexposed 1.5 step exposure. Another camera will add additional exposure to this mode. Three good exposures for the start.
  • Take three or more exposures that you have set with your AEB. In many cameras, you can set the selft timer both seconds when triggered, will get a complete set of exposures for the bracket.
  • Check your image image on the LCD. Check the darkest and brightest exposure. Look at your brightest exposure whether you have received details that entered the dark area in the image. Then check your darkest exposure to make sure your bright area is also exposed well.
  • If you find all the images are too dark, change your base exposure to give more exposure to the image. If all images are too bright, change your base exposure to give less exposure.
  • If you find your exposure range is not fully capturing the brightest and darkest scene, do more than one set of auto brecketing, change your base exposure correctly so that you get the exposure range that covers the brightness range of the scene.
Hopefully the tips above can help us to get better photos. Need real practice so that we can feel what needs to be done when shooting, the tips above are just our basics, the rest is how we try to get the results we want. Thank you, hopefully it can be useful.

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